Open Positions

We currently have openings for Staff Scientist, Postdoctoral Fellow and Research Technician positions.

The group works as a highly dynamic and interactive team and is part of the Center for Immunity and Immunotherapies (CIIT) of Seattle Children’s Research Institute (SCRI). Our studies are funded through a number of grants from the NIH (including the flagship HIVE Center) as well as from the Gates Foundation. You will have the opportunity to interact and form collaborations with CIIT, SCRI and HIVE Center Investigators, as well as with collaborators throughout the Seattle area (University of Washington, Fred Hutch).

Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Torbett Lab offer competitive salaries, relocation assistance (if/as applicable), in addition to eligibility to a competitive benefits package as a full time employee.

Staff Scientists

The laboratory of Dr. Bruce E. Torbett is looking for three Staff Scientists to be respective workstream leaders in the following projects:

1- Lentiviral Vector Engineering and Improved Gene Delivery to Hematopoietic Stem Cells (Project ID 2021-40233)

This translational work aims to improve the delivery of therapeutic genes and gene-modifying agents for the purpose of genetic correction as well as the prevention of viral infections. The candidate will be involved in setting up and managing studies to determine restrictions of lentiviral vector (LV) entry to HSCs and how they can be overcome by using small molecule transduction enhancers (PMID 24914132, 31416800), alternate surface envelopes (PMID 30603655), or engineering improved producer cell lines. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Cell/Molecular Biology related field with documented experience in production and use of lentiviral vectors in primary cells, preclinical testing of LV gene therapy in humanized mouse models, as well as familiarity with standard virology techniques.

Basic Qualifications: lentiviral (LV) vector production and gene delivery to primary cells, preclinical testing of LV vectors in humanized mouse models, standard virology assays (neutralization, titer, packaging efficiency), multicolor flow cytometry analysis and cell sorting, cell culture of primary cells and cell lines, RT-qPCR, protein and nucleic acid isolation and analysis.

Preferred Qualifications: immunoassays (eg. p24 ELISA), gene targeting with CRISPR/Cas9 or equivalent, experience working in BSL2+ and BSL3 biocontainment environments, fluorescence microscopy.

2- Immune Signaling Pathways involved in HIV entry (Project ID 2021-40231)

This work aims to investigate how opioids (and other immune modulators) affect HIV entry and latency, with particular focus on signaling pathways involved in host restriction and viral reactivation. This work also includes focus on the molecular mechanisms for HIV transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex, with insights of novel host-viral interfaces being translatable to new therapeutic strategies. This work involves setting up and managing studies of immune signaling pathways during active HIV infection in primary cells using Molecular Virology approaches. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Virology or related field, with documented experience using standard virology approaches to investigate immune-signaling dynamics.

Basic Qualifications: molecular virology, isolation and culture of primary cells, fluorescence microscopy, various methods of protein isolation and qualification and quantification (including immunoassays), gene-targeting approaches (such as KOs and knockdowns).

Preferred Qualifications: flow cytometry and FACS, use of viral vectors for heterologous gene expression or gene targetting, experience working in BSL2+ and BSL3 biocontainment environments, confocal microcopy (or other high-resolution microscopy).

3- Structural and Biophysical Interactions of HIV Gag/Gag-Pol with host proteins during viral trafficking and assembly (Project ID 2021-40232)

This work aims to investigate how HIV co-opts cellular host machinery during active infection and identify the composition, dynamics, and function of novel host-viral interfaces that can be modulated for new therapeutic strategies (PMID 33807824). This work involves setting up and managing studies utilizing proximity labeling and quantitative proteomics, along with biochemical and virological validation of candidate cellular factors using CRISPR/Cas9 knockouts and confocal imaging techniques. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Biochemistry or related field with documented experience in Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics to identify host-factors of microbial infections, along with experience in target validation using relevant in vivo and in vitro assays.

Basic Qualifications: mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify host-factors of microbial infections, target validation using relevant in vivo and in vitro assays (eg. CRISPR/Cas9), cell culture, fluorescence microscopy, various methods of protein isolation/labeling/qualification/quantification, bioconjugation and/or chemical biology.

Preferred Qualifications: working knowledge of HTS technologies, Immunoassays (such as p24 ELISA), knowledge of structural biology, confocal microscopy, knowledge of bioinformatics as it pertains to analysis of proteomic datasets, protein engineering.

GENERAL JOB RESPONSIBILITIES

    • Implement and run a workstream in an autonomous manner in close coordination with Principal Investigator
    • Development/Writing of Grants and Funding Opportunities
    • Meet with Principal Investigator on a regular basis to discuss proposed/ongoing studies, discuss implications of findings, and provide insights into new research directions
    • Within the candidate’s area of expertise, actively support Principal Investigator in training and supervising of Post-Doctoral Fellows, Graduate Students, and Technicians
    • Run research projects in an independent manner
    • Write manuscripts, present data at national and international conferences
    • Assist PI in writing progress reports, grant proposals, protocols
    • Protocol development and review
    • Excellent communication and writing skills
    • Develop additional scientific skills as appropriate for the research project and carry out research/development activities of assigned research projects.
    • Ability to learn and apply new technologies and skills

INSTRUCTIONS: Interested candidates please e-mail betorbet@uw.edu directly and include CV, three references, and a Cover Letter. Please include Project ID in the Subject Line

Post-Doctoral Fellows

The laboratory of Dr. Bruce E. Torbett is looking for Post-Doctoral Fellows to work on projects related to:

1- Lentiviral Vector Engineering and Improved Gene Delivery to Hematopoietic Stem Cells (Project ID 2021-40236)

This translational work aims to improve the delivery of therapeutic genes and gene-modifying agents for the purpose of genetic correction as well as the prevention of viral infections. The candidate will be involved in setting up and managing studies to determine restrictions of lentiviral vector (LV) entry to HSCs and how they can be overcome by using small molecule transduction enhancers (PMID 24914132, 31416800), alternate surface envelopes (PMID 30603655), or engineering improved producer cell lines. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Cell/Molecular Biology related field with experience in production and use of lentiviral vectors in primary cells, preclinical testing of LV gene therapy in humanized mouse models, as well as familiarity with standard virology techniques.

Basic Qualifications: lentiviral (LV) vector production and gene delivery to primary cells, preclinical testing of LV vectors in humanized mouse models, standard virology assays (neutralization, titer, packaging efficiency), multicolor flow cytometry analysis and cell sorting, cell culture of primary cells and cell lines, RT-qPCR, protein and nucleic acid isolation and analysis.

Preferred Qualifications: immunoassays (eg. p24 ELISA), gene targeting with CRISPR/Cas9 or equivalent, experience working in BSL2+ and BSL3 biocontainment environments, fluorescence microscopy.

2- Immune Signaling Pathways involved in HIV entry (Project ID 2021-40234)

This work aims to investigate how opioids (and other immune modulators) affect HIV entry and latency, with particular focus on signaling pathways involved in host restriction and viral reactivation. This work also includes focus on the molecular mechanisms for HIV transport through the Nuclear Pore Complex, with insights of novel host-viral interfaces being translatable to new therapeutic strategies. This work involves setting up and managing studies of immune signaling pathways during active HIV infection in primary cells using Molecular Virology approaches. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Virology or related field, with experience using standard virology approaches to investigate immune-signaling dynamics.

Basic Qualifications: molecular virology, isolation and culture of primary cells, fluorescence microscopy, various methods of protein isolation and qualification and quantification (including immunoassays), gene-targeting approaches (such as KOs and knockdowns).

Preferred Qualifications: flow cytometry and FACS, use of viral vectors for heterologous gene expression or gene targetting, experience working in BSL2+ and BSL3 biocontainment environments, confocal microcopy (or other high-resolution microscopy).

3- Structural and Biophysical Interactions of HIV Gag/Gag-Pol with host proteins during viral trafficking and assembly (Project ID 2021-40235)

This work aims to investigate how HIV co-opts cellular host machinery during active infection and identify the composition, dynamics, and function of novel host-viral interfaces that can be modulated for new therapeutic strategies (PMID 33807824). This work involves setting up and managing studies utilizing proximity labeling and quantitative proteomics, along with biochemical and virological validation of candidate cellular factors using CRISPR/Cas9 knockouts and confocal imaging techniques. Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Biochemistry or related field with experience in Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics to identify host-factors of microbial infections, along with experience in target validation using relevant in vivo and in vitro assays.

Basic Qualifications: mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify host-factors of microbial infections, target validation using relevant in vivo and in vitro assays (eg. CRISPR/Cas9), cell culture, fluorescence microscopy, various methods of protein isolation/labeling/qualification/quantification, bioconjugation and/or chemical biology.

Preferred Qualifications: working knowledge of HTS technologies, Immunoassays (such as p24 ELISA), knowledge of structural biology, confocal microscopy, knowledge of bioinformatics as it pertains to analysis of proteomic datasets, protein engineering.

GENERAL JOB RESPONSIBILITIES

    • Meet with Principal Investigator on a regular basis to discuss proposed/ongoing studies, discuss implications of findings, and provide insights into new research directions
    • Candidates expected to run research projects in an independent manner
    • Write manuscripts, present data at national and international conferences
    • Assist PI in writing progress reports, grant proposals, protocols
    • Protocol development and review
    • Excellent communication and writing skills
    • Develop additional scientific skills as appropriate for the research project and carry out research/development activities of assigned research projects.
    • Ability to learn and apply new technologies and skills

INSTRUCTIONS: Interested candidates please e-mail betorbet@uw.edu directly and include CV, three references, and a Cover Letter. Please include Project ID in the Subject Line

Research Technician

Project ID 2021-40230

The laboratory of Dr. Bruce E. Torbett is looking for a Research Technician to support ongoing studies on the pathways utilized by HIV for entry and nuclear import, and on the role of cellular proteins participating in immature HIV Gag and Gag-Pol cellular trafficking and assembly. The basic virology insights gleaned from these studies inform our gene therapy work on improving Lentiviral Vector gene delivery to hematopoietic stem cells and leukocytes. Primary responsibility for this position will be running routine assays to support lab members in various projects and assisting Lab Manager with lab maintenance responsibilities. This is an ideal position for those considering graduate school in a related field or medical school in the near future (up to two years).

Basic Qualifications: Bachelor’s Degree in biology, microbiology, immunology, molecular biology or biochemistry. Prior experience in a laboratory setting

Preferred Qualifications: Immunoassays (p24 ELISA), Western Blot, RT-qPCR, Molecular Cloning, Nucleic Acid and Protein isolation and quantification, Mammalian cell culture.

GENERAL JOB RESPONSIBILITIES

    • Working with the Principal Investigator, as well as independently, on the planning, design, execution, trouble-shooting, and interpretation of experiments
    • Make detailed observations, record data and present results
    • Assists post docs, and other research staff in the day-to-day activities and interprets experiments related to assigned projects
    • Will spend the majority of their time making contributions to on-going laboratory projects, requiring the ability to use independent judgment to address tasks and projects, and/or identify and refine existing procedures and practices
    • Excellent communication and writing skills
    • Develop additional scientific skills as appropriate for the research project and carry out research/development activities of assigned research projects.
    • Ability to learn and apply new technologies and skills

INSTRUCTIONS: Interested candidates please e-mail betorbet@uw.edu directly and include CV, three references, and a Cover Letter. Please include Project ID in the Subject Line